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Writing

2012 April 17

Much of the website focuses on my published writing on a range of topics.There are sub-pages for overviews of articles and of books.

You can access an overview and  links to specific titles by clicking on books  here or by the title in the drop down menu  at the top of the page on the right. If you know the  topic – such as animals or suffrage or public history – you can also access the page about the book  through the tags, categories or the search facility – all on the right.

You can access an overview of articles by clicking on articles  here or by the title in the drop down menu  at the top of the page on the right . If you know the individual topic – such as Balto,  animals in London or social knowledge  – you can also access the page about the article  through the tags, categories or the search facility – all on the right.

Information about current research is included within the blog and can be searched by topic through the tags or the search facility –  all on the right.

2 Responses Post a comment
  1. Rodney M Bennett permalink
    September 6, 2014

    Seen your piece in BBC History about feeding animals in the war. I recall we always had a cat though I can not remember how we fed her. We lived in Hampshire and my mother never failed to put a meal on the table, though at times it was a struggle.

    A while ago I met a Russian historian who travelled lecturing on the Siege of Leningrad.

    He would emphasise the minute ration of meat allowed. At the end in Britain, and only Britain, he would often be asked ‘How much was allowed for dogs?!’

    • Hilda Kean permalink
      September 7, 2014

      Thanks for this.The vast majority of cats and dogs did survive – and specific food was not restricted. I take your point about the Russian historian and his questions from British audiences but the question might not be as odd as it first seems. After all in the Nazi occupied Channel Islands dogs had to be registered and were issued with ration cards. Here the civil servants realised that people would ‘fiddle the system’ – and it would be demoralising as dogs and cats were important to keep up human spirits! If you can remember any more about your cat during the war I should be delighted to hear as I am writing a book on animals on the Home Front at the moment.

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